Isaac D’Israeli Quotes and Sayings

Posted by Brian

Isaac D’Israeli was born on 11th May 1766, in Enfield, England. He was a British writer and scholar. He got his education in Leiden, His Literary career began at the age of sixteen. He was the father of British Prime Minister Benjamin D’Israeli. One of his famous literatures is “Mejnoun and Leila” and “Curiosities of Literature”. His words were most popular and were sold widely in 19th century. His literature was having many editions. Curiosities of Literature were first published in four volumes then it was combined in one. Another book “The Life and Reign of Charles 1” was being awarded the degree of D.C.L from Oxford University. When he was writing this book; he was blind. He took help of her daughters to complete the book.

Isaac D’Israeli Quotes and Sayings

A nickname a man may chance to wear out; but a system of calumnity, pursued by a faction, may descend even to posterity. This principal has taken full effect on this state favorite.
– Isaac D’Israeli

And, after all, it is style alone by which posterity will judge of a great work, for an author can have nothing truly his own but his style.
– Isaac D’Israeli

But, indeed, we prefer books to pounds; and we love manuscripts better than florins; and we prefer small pamphlets to war horses.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Every work of Genius is tinctured by the feelings, and often originates in the events of times.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Fortune has rarely condescended to be the companion of genius.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Great collections of books are subject to certain accidents besides the damp, the worms, and the rats; one not less common is that of the borrowers, not to say a word of the purloiners.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Happy the man when he has not the defects of his qualities. [Fr., Heureux l’homme quand il n’a pas les defauts de ses qualites.]
– Isaac D’Israeli

It does at first appear that an astronomer rapt in abstraction, while he gazes on a star, must feel more exquisite than a farmer who in conducting his team. – Isaac D’Israeli,
– Isaac D’Israeli

Literature is an avenue to glory, ever open for those ingenious men who are deprived of honours or of wealth.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Many men of genius must arise before a particular man of genius can appear.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Miscellanists are the most popular writers among every people; for it is they who form a communication between the learned and the unlearned, and, as it were, throw a bridge between those two great divisions of the public.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Philosophy becomes poetry, and science imagination, in the enthusiasm of genius.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Solitude is the nurse of enthusiasm, and enthusiasm is the true parent of genius. In all ages solitude has been called for–has been flown to.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Style! style! why, all writers will tell you that it is the very thing which can least of all be changed. A man’s style is nearly as much a part of him as his physiognomy, his figure, the throbbing of this pulse,–in short, as any part of his being is at least subjected to the action of the will.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The act of contemplation then creates the thing created.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The defects of great men are the consolation of the dunces.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The delight of opening a new pursuit, or a new course of reading, imparts the vivacity and novelty of youth even to old age.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The great man who thinks greatly of himself, is not diminishing that greatness in heaping fuel on his fire.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The golden hour of invention must terminate like other hours, and when the man of genius returns to the cares, the duties, the vexations, and the amusements of life, his companions behold him as one of themselves–the creature of habits and infirmities.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The most noble criticism is that in which the critic is not the antagonist so much as the rival of the author.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The Plagiarism of orators is the art, or an ingenious and easy mode, which some adroitly employ to change, or disguise, all sorts of speeches or their own composition, or that of other authors, for their pleasure, or their utility; in such a manner that it becomes impossible even for the author himself to recognize his own work, his own genius, and his own style, so skillfully shall the whole be disguised. – Isaac D’Israeli,
– Isaac D’Israeli

The Self-Educated are marked by stubborn peculiarities.
– Isaac D’Israeli

The wisdom of the wise, and the experience of ages, may be preserved by quotation.
– Isaac D’Israeli

There is a society in the deepest solitude.
– Isaac D’Israeli

There is an art of reading, as well as an art of thinking, and an art of writing.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Those who do not read criticism will rarely merit to be criticised.
– Isaac D’Israeli

Time the great destroyer of other men’s happiness, only enlarges the patrimony of literature to its possessor.
– Isaac D’Israeli

To think, and to feel, constitute the two grand divisions of men of genius–the men of reasoning and the men of imagination.
– Isaac D’Israeli


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